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ReliefWeb - Training
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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 30 Jan 2019
    Starting date: 06 Feb 2019
    Ending date: 11 Feb 2019

    https://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/our-courses/essentials-of-humanitarian-practice/TheEssentials of Humanitarian Practice provides foundation knowledge for working within the modern humanitarian system and for responding to an international crisis that involves a global response. This course provides participants with an understanding of the complexity of the international relief system and the legal framework for humanitarian assistance. We introduce the characteristics of natural disasters and conflict-induced emergencies and the requirements for an effective humanitarian response, highlighting some of the dilemmas faced by humanitarians and aid workers. Participants will learn about the various United Nations agencies that respond to disasters and the roles these agencies play in coordinating responses for various sectors such as health, water and sanitation and logistics. They will discover how international non-government organisations work with these agencies to share information and data and to avoid duplication and ensure humanitarian aid reaches those who need it and doesn't cause harm. Attendees are given an opportunity to put the knowledge gained into practice and to explore the team skills required to work effectively in the field.


    How to register:

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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 06 Feb 2019
    Starting date: 13 Feb 2019
    Ending date: 17 Feb 2019

    https://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/our-courses/hostile-environment-awareness-training/

    Humanitarian workers are increasingly exposed to challenging, insecure, remote or hostile environments due to lawlessness, political instability and armed conflict, so there is a compelling need for them to be adequately prepared for any dangers they may encounter. Sexual harassment, interactions with aggressive armed combatants, day light robbery and traffic accidents are realistic threats for humanitarians and aid workers. All field workers should be adequately prepared for these events and be proficient in establishing and maintaining telecommunications, whether working in a safe or hostile situation. Conscious of the varying needs within the sector, RedR Australia seeks to address the concerns of a range of organisations and individuals and their insurance providers. These include relief, development, research and advocacy organizations, operational agencies and agencies that are not directly operational but provide support to community based organisations and locally based NGOs.

    RedR Australia's HEAT course includes integrated Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training by Real Response. Real Response will deliver a combination of theory and practical based emergency medical training, giving participants the skills and knowledge to manage ballistic, penetrating and blast trauma. A few of the skills learned in TECC include commercial and improvised tourniquets and haemorrhage control, airway management of an unconscious casualty and an array of improvised techniques teaching students how to save and preserve life with limited resources. Participants will leave the course with the skills and knowledge to provide aid and operate in hostile environments around the world.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 27 Feb 2019
    Starting date: 06 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 08 Mar 2019

    The number of people affected by humanitarian crises globally has almost doubled over the past decade. Increasing emergencies brings a growing demand for humanitarians with expertise in child protection in emergencies (CPiE) and, by delivering this training, we aim to increase the pool of experts available to deploy in this sector.

    This course is an ideal choice for humanitarian practitioners and those entering the sector that have an interest and commitment to child protection, and want to increase their knowledge of how children can be affected in emergency settings. The course will broaden participants’ understanding of child protection within the broader humanitarian system, and equip them with CPiE tools and strategies to apply in the field.

    This intermediate-level course is ideal for people already involved or likely to be involved in child protection in emergencies programming, as a coordinator, practitioner and/or decision maker. It is expected that participants will already have a sound understanding of general child protection issues and an awareness of the risk factors that increase children's vulnerability in emergencies.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 07 Mar 2019
    Starting date: 14 Mar 2019
    Ending date: 15 Mar 2019

    Women working in or traveling to unsafe environments will encounter specific risks and face unique challenges. RedR Australia is committed to providing the highest level of training and preparedness for these women, particularly in hostile or volatile environments which include post-natural disaster, conflict and post-conflict situations.

    This course seeks to provide women a safety and security framework, and with tools and resources, to better self-manage their situation when travelling, living or working in volatile or dangerous contexts. This includes the knowledge and skills to assess and manage safety and security matters in domestic and professional contexts, both locally and overseas.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 19 Apr 2019
    Starting date: 26 Apr 2019
    Ending date: 30 Apr 2019

    [https://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/our-courses/essentials-of-humanitarian-practice/

    The Essentials of Humanitarian Practice provides foundation knowledge for working within the modern humanitarian system and for responding to an international crisis that involves a global response. This course provides participants with an understanding of the complexity of the international relief system and the legal framework for humanitarian assistance. We introduce the characteristics of natural disasters and conflict-induced emergencies and the requirements for an effective humanitarian response, highlighting some of the dilemmas faced by humanitarians and aid workers. Participants will learn about the various United Nations agencies that respond to disasters and the roles these agencies play in coordinating responses for various sectors such as health, water and sanitation and logistics. They will discover how international non-government organisations work with these agencies to share information and data and to avoid duplication and ensure humanitarian aid reaches those who need it and doesn't cause harm. Attendees are given an opportunity to put the knowledge gained into practice and to explore the team skills required to work effectively in the field.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


    0 0

    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 24 Apr 2019
    Starting date: 01 May 2019
    Ending date: 06 May 2019

    Humanitarian workers are increasingly exposed to challenging, insecure, remote or hostile environments due to lawlessness, political instability and armed conflict, so there is a compelling need for them to be adequately prepared for any dangers they may encounter. Sexual harassment, interactions with aggressive armed combatants, day light robbery and traffic accidents are realistic threats for humanitarians and aid workers. All field workers should be adequately prepared for these events and be proficient in establishing and maintaining telecommunications, whether working in a safe or hostile situation. Conscious of the varying needs within the sector, RedR Australia seeks to address the concerns of a range of organisations and individuals and their insurance providers. These include relief, development, research and advocacy organizations, operational agencies and agencies that are not directly operational but provide support to community based organisations and locally based NGOs.

    RedR Australia's HEAT course includes integrated Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training by Real Response. Real Response will deliver a combination of theory and practical based emergency medical training, giving participants the skills and knowledge to manage ballistic, penetrating and blast trauma. A few of the skills learned in TECC include commercial and improvised tourniquets and haemorrhage control, airway management of an unconscious casualty and an array of improvised techniques teaching students how to save and preserve life with limited resources. Participants will leave the course with the skills and knowledge to provide aid and operate in hostile environments around the world.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


    0 0

    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 12 Jun 2019
    Starting date: 19 Jun 2019
    Ending date: 23 Jun 2019

    Humanitarian workers are increasingly exposed to challenging, insecure, remote or hostile environments due to lawlessness, political instability and armed conflict, so there is a compelling need for them to be adequately prepared for any dangers they may encounter. Sexual harassment, interactions with aggressive armed combatants, day light robbery and traffic accidents are realistic threats for humanitarians and aid workers. All field workers should be adequately prepared for these events and be proficient in establishing and maintaining telecommunications, whether working in a safe or hostile situation. Conscious of the varying needs within the sector, RedR Australia seeks to address the concerns of a range of organisations and individuals and their insurance providers. These include relief, development, research and advocacy organizations, operational agencies and agencies that are not directly operational but provide support to community based organisations and locally based NGOs.

    RedR Australia's HEAT course includes integrated Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) training by Real Response. Real Response will deliver a combination of theory and practical based emergency medical training, giving participants the skills and knowledge to manage ballistic, penetrating and blast trauma. A few of the skills learned in TECC include commercial and improvised tourniquets and haemorrhage control, airway management of an unconscious casualty and an array of improvised techniques teaching students how to save and preserve life with limited resources. Participants will leave the course with the skills and knowledge to provide aid and operate in hostile environments around the world.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


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    Organization: RedR Australia
    Country: Australia
    Registration deadline: 12 Jun 2019
    Starting date: 12 Jun 2019
    Ending date: 17 Jun 2019

    The Essentials of Humanitarian Practice provides foundation knowledge for working within the modern humanitarian system and for responding to an international crisis that involves a global response. This course provides participants with an understanding of the complexity of the international relief system and the legal framework for humanitarian assistance. We introduce the characteristics of natural disasters and conflict-induced emergencies and the requirements for an effective humanitarian response, highlighting some of the dilemmas faced by humanitarians and aid workers. Participants will learn about the various United Nations agencies that respond to disasters and the roles these agencies play in coordinating responses for various sectors such as health, water and sanitation and logistics. They will discover how international non-government organisations work with these agencies to share information and data and to avoid duplication and ensure humanitarian aid reaches those who need it and doesn't cause harm. Attendees are given an opportunity to put the knowledge gained into practice and to explore the team skills required to work effectively in the field.


    How to register:

    http://www.redr.org.au/training/humanitarian-training/application-form#.WKvEY9J96Uk


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    Organization: Refugee Studies Centre
    Country: World

    Speaker

    Professor Miriam Ticktin (The New School for Social Research)

    Abstract
    With the grounding assumption that innocence plays a central role in the politics of forced migration and asylum, this lecture delved into the idea of innocence, trying to understand it and render its workings more legible, and arguing that it is a political – not simply a religious or moral – concept. By examining the figure of the child, the trafficked victim, the migrant, asylum seeker, the enemy combatant and the animal, Professor Ticktin suggested that innocence sets up hierarchies of humanity, all the while feeding an expanding politics of humanitarianism. Ultimately, she asked if innocence is a concept we want to protect.

    About the speaker
    Miriam Ticktin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at The New School for Social Research and co-director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University, in co-tutelle with the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. Before coming to the New School, Miriam was an Assistant Professor in Women’s Studies and Anthropology at the University of Michigan, and also held a postdoctoral position in the Society of Fellows at Columbia University.

    Professor Ticktin's research has focused in the broadest sense on what it means to make political claims in the name of a universal humanity. She has been interested in what these claims tell us about universalisms and difference, about who can be a political subject, on what basis people are included and excluded from communities, and how inequalities get instituted or perpetuated in this process. She is the author of *Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France(University of California Press, 2011; co-winner of the 2012 William A. Douglass Prize in Europeanist Anthropology) and co-editor (with Ilana Feldman) of In the Name of Humanity: the Government of Threat and Care (Duke University Press, 2010), along with many other articles and book chapters. She is a founding editor of the journalHumanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development.*Next year she will be a fellow at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study.


    How to register:

    A podcast of this lecture is now available.


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    Organization: Refugee Studies Centre
    Country: World

    ANNUAL HARRELL-BOND LECTURE 2017

    About the lecture

    Migration is set to become one of the defining features of the 21st century. The combined impact of crises, poverty, inequality and violence around the world has led to unprecedented numbers of people fleeing their homes in search of safety, better living conditions and employment opportunities. At the same time, significant gaps exist in humanitarian protection vis-à-vis the increasing numbers of migrants who do not fit into conventional categories of international protection. This phenomenon is further exacerbated by increasing negative attitudes towards migrants. As States scale up their border controls, where do you turn to when you become the world’s most unwanted? Why has the world turned a blind eye towards the significant – and evidence-based – litany of abuses faced by people on the move: death, arbitrary detention, rape, trafficking, violence…to name just a few.

    All people who leave their homes—for whatever reason—deserve our respect and our support: this is the essence of the Fundamental Principles of Humanity and is why the approach of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is one of helping migrants in need irrespective of their status.

    As the internal community is attempting to work better together on this challenging issue – including through the negotiation of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration and a Global Compact on Refugees – we as a global community need to ask some important questions:

    • How can we do more to support the safety, well-being and dignity of refugees and vulnerable migrants?
    • How can we build on experiences and good practices – of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other humanitarian and development actors?
    • How can we address negative perceptions about migrants?
    • Who can be our potential partners? Migrants and refugees and host communities? The private sector? Youth? Entrepreneurs? New humanitarian donors?
    • How can we bring about these changes in a way that has a real impact on the lives of the most vulnerable?

    About the speaker

    Dr Jemilah Mahmood began her mandate as Under Secretary General for Partnerships at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in January 2016.

    Before joining the IFRC, Dr Mahmood was the Chief of the World Humanitarian Summit secretariat at the United Nations in New York. She is well known as the founder of MERCY Malaysia, which she led from 1999-2009. Her previous appointments include Chief of the Humanitarian Response Branch at UNFPA, Senior Fellow at Malaysia’s Sovereign, and Senior Visiting Research Fellow at the Humanitarian Futures Programme at Kings College in London. In 2006, she was one of 16 members appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General to the Advisory Group of the Central Emergency Response Fund.

    Dr Mahmood has held many Board positions in NGOs and INGOs and is the recipient of numerous national and international awards for her contribution to civil society and work in support of marginalized communities. She is currently the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Humanitarian Leadership Academy and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Foundation, both in the United Kingdom. She was recently appointed as a board member to the Responsible Finance Institute.

    Dr Mahmood is an Obstetrician and Gynaecologist and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists United Kingdom.


    How to register:

    The podcast of the lecture is available here: https://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/news/the-displacement-paradox-good-refugees-bad-migrants-where-can-the-unwanted-go-annual-harrell-bond-lecture-2017